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4/14/2015

CDFW gets P-22 out from under SoCal home

UPDATE: As of 11:00 a.m. on Tuesday, April 14, CDFW and local researchers are reporting P-22 has left the building. His radio collar indicates he has moved out of the crawl space under the Los Feliz home.

The following story was written by Charlotte Alter and originally posted on the LA Times website earlier this morning.


A mountain lion that has been hiding under a Los Angeles home since Monday was still there as of Tuesday morning.

The lion, known as P-22, became famous in the area after National Geographic photographer Steve Winter captured an image of the animal in front of the Hollywood Sign. P-22 spends most of his time in Griffith Park, in the Santa Monica Mountains, but on Monday wandered into a crawlspace under the home of Jason and Paula Archinaco.

The big cat was discovered by two workers who were installing a security system in the home. "I didn't think for two seconds that it was a mountain lion in my house," Jason Archinaco told the Los Angeles Times. "If someone says Bigfoot's in your house, you go, 'Yeah,' and you stick your head in there."
Photo of P-22 under house.
P-22 had to cross two major freeways in order to reach Griffith Park, a feat that has made him into something of a big cat celebrity. The National Geographic shot turned him from wildlife celebrity to bona fide star, and scientists have attached a GPS collar to help track his movements.

To get P-22 out from under the home, officials from the Department of Fish and Wildlife poked the mountain lion with a pole, then threw tennis balls and bean bags at him, but all their efforts have so far been unsuccessful.

The Mountain Lion Foundation will continue to monitor this situation. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for the latest details.








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